Constant Eighth '233' Syncopated Groove

A groove construction idea based on a syncopated '233' rhythm.

In this lesson you will be learning another groove construction idea based on the '233' rhythm, which means they will be similar to those covered in similar lessons and could also be thought of as the reverse of our '332' syncopated groove lessons. At the bottom of this page you will find a list of links to lessons you may find useful, if at any point you find yourself struggling have a look through some of these.

An explanation of the '332' rhythm is given in the lessons linked above so if you are unfamiliar with this concept check these out. On this page I will show you two different orchestrations of this pattern, each with multiple different ideas for right hand placement.


Snare To Kick Version

In this first version of the groove the snare will be played on the first of each grouping and the remaining notes will be played on a kick. The snare and bass drum part will look like this:

The kick and snares for this version of the groove

As with most grooves covered previously, you could play straight eighth notes on the right hand over this on any part of the kit. This is very easy to do as the right hand will fall with all kick and snare notes, which would look like this:

The first version of this groove with an eighth note right hand

The other common right hand pattern is obviously quarter notes. This is a little more tricky to apply but will really highlight the syncopated nature of this rhythm. You may need to slow this groove right down to get comfortable with the note placement.

The first version of this groove with a quarter note right hand

The final version I will show you has a right hand at the same time as the snare and playing all kicks on there own. That would look like this:

The first version of this groove with a dotted quarter note right hand


Kick To Snare Version

In this version you will just be reversing the placement of the kick and snares. So the first note of each grouping will be played on a kick and the remaining notes on the snare. That would look like this:

The kick and snares for this version of the groove

The same right hand ideas can be applied above this, so here it is with eighth note rides:

The first version of this groove with an eighth note right hand

And again with quarter note crashes. As discussed above, this placement is a little more tricky so don't be afraid to slow it right down.

The first version of this groove with a quarter note right hand

Then finally with ride bells on all kick notes.

The first version of this groove with a dotted quarter note right hand


There are many more variations that can be made on this simple construction idea that will be covered in later lessons. For now use the grooves given above to familiarize you with the different feels shown around this rhythm.


TASK

  • Learn the grooves above up to a tempo of at least 120bpm.
  • Orchestrate the right hand in various places around the kit.
  • Use the concept as part of a phrased example.
  • Try constructing longer patterns based on this rhythm, such as two or four bar grooves.