Single Stroke 4 Fills With A Kick On Beat 2

Taking the straight single stroke four and replacing the second note with a kick, then applying orchestrations to create complex sound fills.

In this lesson you will be learning another single stroke four fill where a specific stroke of the rudiment is moved to the kick, in this case the second stroke. Similar ideas has been covered previously and you can find a link to some useful lessons at the bottom of the page. As with these other fills, this creates an interesting sounding pattern that you can create many variations on. Using the kick in this way can make the fills sound far more complicated than they are and can be far more interesting than just straight rolls.

To get you started I have given the pattern as eighth note triplets. Starting slow like this will allow you to work on the placement of the hands on feet easily and the timing of the notes is very important. If the kick and hands start falling 'offbeat' the part will become sloppy and start sounding rubbish.

The basic part as eighth note triplets

Notice that the single stroke four sticking is maintained throughout, even when hands are replaced with a bass drum. Spend some time getting this pattern up to a tempo of around 140bpm then try the version below which is written at full speed but still un-orchestrated:

The basic part as sixteenth note triplets.

Spend time time getting the full speed version up to a tempo of at least 110bpm and, as mentioned above, make sure the placement of all notes is accurate. When you have the part sounding good have a go at the orchestrations given below.


Orchestration 1

An orchestration on the basic pattern


Orchestration 2

An orchestration on the basic pattern


Orchestration 3

An orchestration on the basic pattern


Orchestration 4

An orchestration on the basic pattern


Orchestration 5

An orchestration on the basic pattern


TASK

  • Using the 2 minute rule, get all orchestrations up to a tempo of at least 130bpm.
  • Create four bar patterns that use these orchestrations as fills.
  • Experiment with creating different lengths of fill based on these orchestrations.