Groove Development: 16-10-2018 (3/4 Heavy Metal Double Kick Groove)

An intricate metal based 3/4 double kick groove.

In this lesson you will learn a two bar groove in 3/4 where the bass drums play a constant single stroke sixteenth with rhythmic interest created with the right hand. This is then decorated with toms to create a complex and melodic sounding part. There will be seven modifications made to the start groove, each of which makes the part more difficult. It is also worth noting that each step creates its own perfectly decent sounding groove. The first step assumes some ability to play simple double kick parts, if this is a new style of playing to you it would be worth looking through our free online lessons linked at the end of the pack.

It's important you can play the step you are on comfortably at a decent tempo before progressing as any parts you get stuck on are going to appear in all subsequent steps. At the bottom of the page you will find a list of helpful links, suggestions for other concepts that could be applied and a set of target tempos.

This particular groove is intended to be used in a metal context and features some ideas commonly used in this genre. The right hand ties in with the rhythm of the guitar part of the backing track provided and toms are used to add melody and rhythm around this.

You can also download a version of this lesson in PDF format. In this pack you also get two extra steps in the groove construction process, three sets of eight bar phrases using the final groove as a basis and audio files in MP3 format of all drum parts. This also includes a drumless version of the backing track for you to play a long to. You can purchase this for just $2 by clicking the button below.

NOTE that the file size of this pack is 14MB.


Step 1

The starting point is a run of Single Stroke Sixteenths played over two feet with a snare placed on the three count, giving the part a rough half time feel. A common construction method in metal grooves is to have the kick drum pick out rhythms the bass and guitars are playing, however here that is done with the right hand. The crash on the 'a' count often throws people off so focus on the accuracy of that placement.

Developing a two bar 3/4 double kick groove


Step 2

A floor tom is placed on the '+' after count 1 in both bars with the left hand. Over that '+ a' you have opposite hands and feet playing together, the focus in this step should be making that movement nice and strong.

Developing a two bar 3/4 double kick groove


Step 3

Another floor tom is added on the '+' after count 2, this time with a right hand. As with other steps, make sure the tom lines up correctly with the kick.

Developing a two bar 3/4 double kick groove


Step 4

Add a high tom just before the floor tom from the previous step with the left hand, on the 'e' after the 2 count.

Developing a two bar 3/4 double kick groove


Step 5

A run of four 32nd floor toms is added on the '+' after count 3. This is played as single strokes and the right hands of the movement line up with the bass drums.

Developing a two bar 3/4 double kick groove


Step 6

Another floor tom is added on the 'e' after count 1 in the second bar with a left hand, so both of those floor toms will be played on the same hand. This helps to prevent quick jumps from the floor tom to crash, making the movements a little smoother.

Developing a two bar 3/4 double kick groove


Step 7

On count 3 of the second bar you will copy the 32nd note rhythm from the first bar but orchestrated on the snare.

Developing a two bar 3/4 double kick groove