'1e+' Double Kick Foot Ostinato Grooves

Varying the rhythm of a constant 16th note double kick pattern to create a different rhythmic feel.

In this lesson you will be learning another double kick groove construction idea which will be quite similar to our Galloping Double Kick lesson. In that lesson all 'e' counts were removed from a run of straight sixteenth notes and for these grooves you will be removing the 'a' counts creating a 1 e + rhythmic base. On top of this foot ostinato you will be adding various snare and cymbal parts to create a wide variety of grooves.

These rhythms are very commong in metal and it's sub genres but can also be applied to most styles of music.

Shown below is the pattern the feet will be playing in all grooves. By now you should be familiar with this simple rhythm but you may need to spend some time working on the co ordination of your feet. The way I would approach this is to think of it as straight singles with the last left foot taken out, giving you an ordering of 'R L R R L R'. Remember that in our double kick notation the left foot for a double kick is shown on the line below the standard bass drum, this makes working the ordering of the feet for this pattern a little easier. Here it is:

An exercise

Spend some time getting comfortable with this foot part before progressing to using it in groove parts. As usual, start with a low tempo but build up to a higher tempo than you would normally, around 160bpm would be good.

For the sake of this lesson the foot ostinato shown above will be used as written. In later grooves I will show how you can remove feet when snares are used to create an interesting alternative to this pattern. Listed below are some examples of grooves with this rhythm applied. I have tried to give as many different construction ideas as possible but remember to treat these as suggestions for constructing your own groove parts. You will notice that some construction ideas are the same as the lesson linked above.


Example 1

A common time example with eighth note right hand.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


Example 2

A half time example with a quarter note right hand.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


Example 3

A double time example with eighth note right hand.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


Example 4

A half time groove where the right hand follows the rhythm of the double kick.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


Example 5

The rhythm applied under a 3/4 groove with a snare on beat 3.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


Example 6

A common time version in 6/4.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


Example 7

Adding in an additional sixteenth note in a common time version of this groove.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


Example 8

Filling in some 'a' counts with a ghosted snare in a half time version of the groove.

A groove with a 1e+ foot ostinato


TASK

  1. Using the 2 Minute Rule, get all grooves examples up to a tempo of at least 150bpm.
  2. Create further variations on these grooves.
  3. Apply these grooves to a phrased piece.