Semi Quaver Groupings - e + a

A new note value grouping made of three semi quavers starting on the 'e' count.

In our fills, rudiment orchestrations and basic rudiment stickings we have been using 16th notes (otherwise known as semi quavers), but we haven't really mixed together different rhythms. In this lesson series we are going to use a combination of 8th and 16th notes to give our patterns a more interesting sound. We will cover four new rhythms that will be based around four semi quavers. For each pattern you will be given the basic rhythm and it's counting as well as orchestrations that can later be used as fills.

The idea for creating these new rhythms is very simple, we will start with a group of 4 semi quavers and we just take one of these out. In this first lesson you will be creating a rhythm by removing the first semi quaver in a group of four. That would look like this:

The first semi quaver grouping

Look at the sticking. Notice how it sticks to the single stroke roll sticking even when notes are removed? This will help you keep a natural feeling 'flow' the the part. If we switch it round and start the 'e' count on a right hand, you will be ending the rhythm on a left hand which can sometimes be uncomfortable to get out of when played as a fill.

The squiggly symbol on all the crotchet counts is a semi quaver rest. A rest is a point in the music where nothing is played, but it still has a rhythmic value. So in this case we play nothing for a 16th note count.

TASK

  1. Practice the rhythm until you can play it at 120bpm.

Listed below are four orchestrations for this rhythm:


Example 1

The first semi quaver grouping orchestrated


Example 2

The first semi quaver grouping orchestrated


Example 3

The first semi quaver grouping orchestrated


Example 4

The first semi quaver grouping orchestrated


When crotchet feet are used in this orchestration they will fall where the hands are resting. Like this:

The first semi quaver grouping with feet


The first semi quaver grouping with feet


TASK

  1. Practice all orchestrations on this sheet and add in your own feet patterns.
  2. Create your own orchestrations, look back at our rudiment orchestration collection for ideas.

Try a similar lesson where the second note is removed here.